Note on My Restless Being

From the Composer

A working man’s lament, with a sports theme!

example 1: opening of My Restless Being from St. Stephen's Psalter

-Peter Margen

From the Arranger

I couldn’t claim any credit originally for arranging this movement. Peter’s solo was so nice, that I felt it didn’t need anything else. Then we started rehearsals. My original idea of having one Baritone soloist and one Soprano soloist went by the boards as the solo group grew to two baritones, one tenor, and two sopranos, augmented by two altos in movement 3. This movement, the final bastion of the solo, became in part a duet for the two baritones, whose voices blended quite nicely.

example 2: duet section of My Restless Being from St. Stephen's Psalter

The first half, “I am troubled…” is still a solo. The second half, where the text speaks of grass being fulfilled, becomes the duet, as the two voices move in close harmony. The solo resumes at “Oh please help me God,” as the music returns to its opening material and—in what I’m thinking is characteristic of Margen’s compositional style, ends harmonically open.

example: end of My Restless Being from St. Stephen's Psalter

-Robert Train Adams

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