Note on Lord my boat has no rudder

From the Composer

This text is just plain fun, but fun with a message. It was organized into verses by the psalmist, so the idea of using the same melody for each verse seemed obvious. The words pretty much sang themselves. All I needed to do was decide how to treat each verse. The women sing the first verse (with so many of the psalms speaking with a male voice—thus lots of solos for men—it provided a contrast to have the women begin).

example1: verse 1 of Lord my boat has no rudder from St. Stephen's Psalter

The sopranos continued with verse two, while the other voices portray the rise and fall of wind and wave.

example 2: verse 2 of Lord my boat has no rudder from St. Stephen's Psalter

The men take over the melody in verse three while the women provide a commentary, painting a picture in sound of pathways going helter-skelter.

example 3: verse 3 of Lord my boat has no rudder from St. Stephen's Psalter

The altos lead on verse four, with the other voices emphasizing important words (a little Coplandesque). A brief coda (not shown) restates the theme of the psalm.

example 4: verse 4 of Lord my boat has no rudder from St. Stephen's Psalter

-Robert Train Adams

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